Music of Alduria-Wechua

From The World of Iceria
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The music of Alduria-Wechua is wide-ranging and reflects its multiethnic diversity through many kinds of music styles, instruments, and compositions. Music from Alduria-Wechua is a mixture of music influenced by the music of the Wechua Nation, Alexandria, Alduria, Caputia, Natopia, and Babkha.

For example, Wechua influences can be best heard in the myriad of wind instruments present in most of the autochthonous music of Keltia and in the shape of many of the melodies of some of the most popular modern compositions. The Alexandrian influences come in strong in the rhythm and percussion instruments. Hammish (later Caputian) influences can be heard in the varied harmonies and stringed instruments.

Much of the Alexandrian influence in Alduro-Wechua popular music can be traced back to the emergence of the Afro-Alexandrian blues, from the Afro-Alexandrian communities in the capital, Geneva, and in central Tapfer, specifically East Baudrix, Rio Grande, and New Alexandria. The music culture in Alexandria during its early period is poorly documented, but it is known that it included a lot of church music from the Church of Alexandria, military band music, and diverse genres of dance music cultivated by the jíbaros (the rural working-class of San Martin). While the Martino jíbaros never constituted more than 11% of the Alexandrian island province's population, they contributed some of the most dynamic and distinct musical features of Alexandrian music.

Caputian influences come from the well-established musical traditions from the old Kingdom of Hamland and the Church of Hamland. Hammish, Israati, and Haifan musicians honed their crafts and created different indigenous genres that influenced the national musical heritage of Caputia and later the Wechua Nation. When Caputia collapsed to the White Plague, millions of Caputians sought refuge and resettled in the Wechua Nation and brought their musical styles and creativity with them.

To add to the rich musical tradition of the Federation, policies in both Alduria and Wechua (starting in 1669 AN) in relation to immigration opened both countries prior to their Federation in 1685 AN to more styles and instruments from around the world, especially nations in the Raspur Pact like Natopia and Constancia. The influence of Alduro-Wechua allies and stateless refugees has contributed greatly to the distinct and varied musical heritage of the Federation. A renaissance of Babkhan music, both pop and traditional, in the Baatharzi Autonomous State has propelled renewed public interest and attention to native Euran music and culture in the Federation.

Many cities and towns in Alduria-Wechua have vibrant music scenes which, in turn, support their own distinct regional musical styles, stories, and traditions. In the Wechua Nation, music was for centuries used to pass down odes of historical deeds or to praise the Sun God Inti. This has influenced more modern takes or versions on traditional Wechua music leading to a variety of fusion genres. The Federation counts on a varied list of musical centers, nestled in some of the Federation's largest cities, some in the more remote areas of the Wechua highlands or the fertile valleys of Baatharz. Some of them are Parap, Punta Santiago, Piriya, Rimarima, Fontainebleau, Amapola, San Luis, and Alkhiva. Important mid-sized scenes in cities such as Susa, Apurimaq, Narbonne, Norvind, and Kedah have all contributed some of the most popular artists, styles, and compositions in the Federation.

Popular styles

Alduria

Wechua

Santander

Valencia

Artists

Alduria

Wechua

Santander

Valencia

See also